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View Full Version : Pagan mom, Christian dad= ??? baby?



AngelGypsy
06-08-2004, 08:28 PM
I was wondering if anyone here had this issue.

I'm pagan. Wiccan Eclectic, solitary. The Husband was raised Lutheran, although he does not really participate in church or spirituality. He is a good man who lives a good life, and I try to be as well. We just don't choose to attend a building once a week to show how "devout" we are.

We have coexisted peacefully this way for just over a decade. I respect his religious upbringing, and have even attended his church with he and his mother. When we married we chose non-denominational vows with a slightly pagan spin, (although the Jamaican preacher butchered them so badly, no one could tell the difference, even us) He likewise respects my beliefs and we both agree that at the core, our beliefs and morals are very similar.

I'm currently pregnant with our first child, and this is where I become a little lost. Has anyone else raised children or are raising them in a multi-faith household? If so, how are you handling it? How do you handle things like christening, bible school, etc?

I am fairly sure that my MIL will be expecting us to christen our child as a Lutheran, as she is not really aware that I am not Christian. Mostly because I've refrained from raising the issue or making a big deal about not being one. My basic attitude is, let me follow my path, I'll let you follow yours, and blessed be. She assumed I am catholic I think, since I told her once that was how I was raised, and she never brought it up again.

My general thinking about the baby's upbringing has always kind of been that we would expose him to different paths, and let him choose what works best for him when he is old enough to decide for himself. Would christening him a Lutheran interfere with that? Especially if I was also doing my best to show him by example the basics of my beliefs and show him other religions along the way?

I welcome any thoughts and insights anyone else might have. I consider myself pretty open minded and hope those who do have an opinion can be so as well.

Thanks in advance for your thoughts!

biker
06-08-2004, 09:28 PM
Why not let the child make their own decision about which religion is right for the child??? Show her/him BOTH religions then let them make the choice

AngelGypsy
06-08-2004, 10:46 PM
Why not let the child make their own decision about which religion is right for the child??? Show her/him BOTH religions then let them make the choice

Well, that IS basically my plan.

I think what I'm wondering is if its ok if I go ahead and christen him, and allow him to attend church with his grandma, but meanwhile be reinforcing the idea that there are other religions. Also, that just because he's been christened one way does not mean he can't choose to follow another path. I'd also teach him that the most important thing is to be a good person.

I guess I'm just wondering if that's good enough, since it also seems the path of least resistance. I also would welcome other people's input who have been through this.

Magdalene
06-08-2004, 11:50 PM
Why not let the child make their own decision about which religion is right for the child??? Show her/him BOTH religions then let them make the choice

Well, that IS basically my plan.

I think what I'm wondering is if its ok if I go ahead and christen him, and allow him to attend church with his grandma, but meanwhile be reinforcing the idea that there are other religions. Also, that just because he's been christened one way does not mean he can't choose to follow another path. I'd also teach him that the most important thing is to be a good person.

I guess I'm just wondering if that's good enough, since it also seems the path of least resistance. I also would welcome other people's input who have been through this.

My two cents, from a Catholic POV....baptism (for Catholics) tends to involve a promise to raise the child in that faith. I don't know how Lutherans do it, but I'll guess that the same intent is there in their baptisms.

So....the question is, if your husband weren't around for some reason, would you raise your child in the Lutheran faith, or not? (My mom faced a similiar question when being asked if she would raise her children Catholic--she's Protestant. She said if my dad were willing, yes, if not, no, as Catholicism was not *her* religious practice.)

You seem to prefer exposing him to both paths and letting him choose, so my personal opinion is baptism might not be a good idea at this point. If the child wants to be Lutheran, he can be baptized as an adult. (I wasn't confirmed in the Catholic Church until I was 26 years old, and it was probably better that way.)

However, if the MIL raises all hell over the baptism thing, do whatever you need to do to prevent World War III. :wink:

Lady V
06-09-2004, 05:26 AM
I agree with Magdalene....in the Lutheran church (or at least, down here in TX), you are baptized/christened at a few months old. When you hit the pre-teens (6th grade usually), *you* make the decision to be confirmed in the faith - or not.

If it will cause a problem with your in-laws, I'd say go ahead and have him christened. I'm trying to remember the litergy, but it doesn't say specifically that you will raise him "Lutheran", just in a godly household, teach him the laws of the church.....etc.

My dad is a semi-retired Lutheran minister, but he hauled us kids around to every type of church in the area...the oddest, to me, was the Buddist funeral we attended - *way* different from our usual venue. He wanted us to know what we believed, not just profess it.

emalia
06-09-2004, 08:51 AM
I was permitted to pick my own... I don't see anything wrong with baptizing a small child. When they are baptized, you promise to bring them up to the best of your ability.

You can teach a child both sides of things.. They make Pagan coloring books BTW.. they are quite cool, and show a very "Normal" way of life. It is a good basis for those that don't understand.

You can also bring your child up non-denominational. That is what I had alot of. My mother had relics of saints about the house, mostly the one for animals. But we weren't catholic. I went to a lutheran school. I was taught at home, that it isn't a building that makes a church. We celebrated the Church of Life. That is seeing "God" in everything around us, in the trees, the grass, the dogs.. Everything.. Not in a building.

I am pgan by choice, but I believe that it is all the same when it is boiled down to the nitty gritty

AngelGypsy
06-09-2004, 10:01 AM
Good points all.

I personally would prefer to forego baptism for now, and just allow him to decide for himself if he wants it later on. I think spirituality is important and I want him to know that any path he chooses is the alright by me. In the end that is what really counts.

I think its cool that so many here were given the choice. I'd rather he truly believed in his path, no matter what it is. I don't want to force feed it to him and try to make him believe that its my way or the highway. I hope to teach him tolerance by example. Know what I mean?

Ysobelle
06-09-2004, 11:14 AM
Baptism or the like was never an option in my family, of course. I got to choose to confirm my faith when I was 13-- well, I had to decide to do it well in advance, but you get the idea.

I just wonder if, had I been set on a path of another faith as a baby, I would have thought in later life that that's what I was supposed to be, no matter what I was told later? You know, "I was baptised, so this is what I'm meant to be"? I'd lean towards leaving your son a clean slate. Let him make his own way to the answers.

*Gremco
06-09-2004, 04:24 PM
Disclaimer: This is not my opinion, only what I have been told by my budding theologian mother. Yes I realize it seems unfair and presumptuous.

I'm not sure of the Lutheran stance on baptism, but if you dig deep enough into Catholic theology, they believe that once you are baptized Catholic, you are bound to Catholicism for life. You can choose to practice differently, but are considered Catholic.

If the Lutherans have the same opinion, I would forgo baptism. I was baptized and raised Catholic, and it has influenced me throughout life, even though I do not consider myself even remotely Catholic anymore.

Alianne
06-09-2004, 05:19 PM
Having been in an interfaith marriage (Jewish/Methodist), these are some of the things we learned and some of the things we did to 'work around' the relatives. :)

We were leaning towards 'expose them to both and let them decide' and then came across research that indicated that most kids raised that way never ended up making a choice one way or another. This, *we* didn't want to chance.

Judaism was more important to me than Christianity was to David in regards to how children were being raised. He was *very* lapsed. :)

So, we decided to raise our children as Jews and David was always supportive of helping them -- he would walk them to Sunday School and Hebrew School, volunteered at some of the kids activities...things like that.

We did expose them to various aspects of Christianity -- we celebrated Christmas and had a tree because a tree was the *one* thing David didn't want to give up from his upbringing and his past.

As far as my late MIL goes, when our eldest was a baby, we did take him to her Methodist church in Baltimore, but rather than have him baptized, he was formally introduced to the congregation as my in-laws' first grandchild, held by the minister and had a blessing said over him...but it was not baptism. This satisfied her. We had both let them know prior to our eldest's birth that we had decided together on Judaism because, quite frankly, when it boiled down to it, David didn't really want to be the one responsible for their religious upbringing and I was willing to take that responsibility on.

My experience, FWIW. :)

Nevada
06-09-2004, 05:25 PM
Okay I was baptised high church Episcopal...but chose my own path when I was older...Mom, bless her, exposed my bro and I to as many religions as possible to teach us understanding...he is very methodist I am pagan...my pagan husband is still considered mormon because of his mom..It gets funny...I did promise my mom to have my child, when I get around to having one, baptised. It makes her happy and as the woman who hauled me around in her for 9 months and put up with me, its the least I could do.

lavender r dragon
06-09-2004, 05:36 PM
If the Lutherans have the same opinion, I would forgo baptism. I was baptized and raised Catholic, and it has influenced me throughout life, even though I do not consider myself even remotely Catholic anymore.


no matter what religion you raise them or if you raise them going to lots of differnet churches its still going to influence their entire life..if you baptize them to please your inlaws you still don't *have* to raise them in it (no one will make you) ..you could still raise them in different religions..just my $0.02

heather

*Gremco
06-09-2004, 05:58 PM
Let me see if I can sort my meaning out

When I said I was baptized and raised Catholic, but am no longer one was in response to


ysobelle

just wonder if, had I been set on a path of another faith as a baby, I would have thought in later life that that's what I was supposed to be, no matter what I was told later? You know, "I was baptised, so this is what I'm meant to be"? I'd lean towards leaving your son a clean slate. Let him make his own way to the answers

I guess I'm trying to say that just because you were baptised one way, does not nessicarily mean a person would think that that is that. But again, it is one thing where every one differs, I can only speak for myself.

I was advising against a Lutheran baptisim only if they think that once a Lutheran, always a Lutheran and there is nothing you can do about it.

I'm not sure if I"m making myself any clearer or if I"m digging myself in deeper. I hope this helps.

AngelGypsy
06-09-2004, 06:42 PM
Let me see if I can sort my meaning out

When I said I was baptized and raised Catholic, but am no longer one was in response to


ysobelle

just wonder if, had I been set on a path of another faith as a baby, I would have thought in later life that that's what I was supposed to be, no matter what I was told later? You know, "I was baptised, so this is what I'm meant to be"? I'd lean towards leaving your son a clean slate. Let him make his own way to the answers

I guess I'm trying to say that just because you were baptised one way, does not nessicarily mean a person would think that that is that. But again, it is one thing where every one differs, I can only speak for myself.

I was advising against a Lutheran baptisim only if they think that once a Lutheran, always a Lutheran and there is nothing you can do about it.

I'm not sure if I"m making myself any clearer or if I"m digging myself in deeper. I hope this helps.

Nope you are making sense. To me anyway. I may not be commenting on EVERY post, but I am reading them and they are giving me food for thought. Like I mentioned before, my preference would be to avoid christening my critter and giving him the choice later. Most of the posts here have convinced me that's the best way. Its nice to feel like my first impulse might have been the right one.

AngelGypsy
06-09-2004, 07:46 PM
I should also add that I was baptized and raised Catholic. I went to catholic school til 8th grade. But as an adult I began searching out other beliefs and found that Wicca seemed to have the most resonance for me. There are some other things thrown in there too, but the majority of my belief system is WIccan.

Bonnie Strangeways
08-11-2004, 01:23 PM
Good points all.

I personally would prefer to forego baptism for now, and just allow him to decide for himself if he wants it later on. I think spirituality is important and I want him to know that any path he chooses is the alright by me. In the end that is what really counts.

I think its cool that so many here were given the choice. I'd rather he truly believed in his path, no matter what it is. I don't want to force feed it to him and try to make him believe that its my way or the highway. I hope to teach him tolerance by example. Know what I mean?

I am a Practioner, my ex is an Episcopalian (Ouch on spelling!) We determined to forego baptism until our son is old enough to make his own choice. Belive me, no matter what you belive, God/Goddess/or Other, the Great Power knows of your child's existance. I know many religions teach that your child must be baptised immediately in order for God to *see* him/her. I'm of the belief that our Supreme does not overlook our children, so the fear that our children will go unrecognized is unfounded.

Raise and love your baby in the belief that all life is sacred. Teach them well, surround them with peace and love, and educate them to realize that we are all the same at the core of it, and your baby will have a firm understanding and be able to choose their own path.

Blessings upon you and yours.

Bonnie Strangeways
08-11-2004, 01:23 PM
Good points all.

I personally would prefer to forego baptism for now, and just allow him to decide for himself if he wants it later on. I think spirituality is important and I want him to know that any path he chooses is the alright by me. In the end that is what really counts.

I think its cool that so many here were given the choice. I'd rather he truly believed in his path, no matter what it is. I don't want to force feed it to him and try to make him believe that its my way or the highway. I hope to teach him tolerance by example. Know what I mean?

I am a Practioner, my ex is an Episcopalian (Ouch on spelling!) We determined to forego baptism until our son is old enough to make his own choice. Belive me, no matter what you belive, God/Goddess/or Other, the Great Power knows of your child's existance. I know many religions teach that your child must be baptised immediately in order for God to *see* him/her. I'm of the belief that our Supreme does not overlook our children, so the fear that our children will go unrecognized is unfounded.

Raise and love your baby in the belief that all life is sacred. Teach them well, surround them with peace and love, and educate them to realize that we are all the same at the core of it, and your baby will have a firm understanding and be able to choose their own path.

Blessings upon you and yours.

Galleywench
08-11-2004, 02:17 PM
Another two cents from a multidenominational family. Born into Roman catholic family, dad divorced and when he remarried he converted to Judaism. Our family had a hodgepodge of holidays but the basic tenets of faith never truly changed...harm none and do what you will...never realizing what that meant until I was older. My husband is an Athiest for all intents and purposes. Jay beleives in Science, he is a pragmatist and relies on what he can personally witness or experience as physical evidence.

Our daughter is 10 months old and has not been baptised formally. She was baptised a la Archie bunker style in the hospital by 3 people that I am aware of. My two older daughers from my previous marriage are living the Roman catholic faith...parochial school and everything. The fact that thier youger sibling is not being raised the same way has sparked a great deal of debate in our home, some of it quite heated. The arguments are not between my husband and myself but between myself and my 13 year old who is concerned that we are all going to hell for a variety of reasons.

The decision of faith and organized religion in the home is a delicate one and bears waiting until you consider all of the options. The choice will eventually become that of the child no matter what you decide. It seems to be most important that you keep in force the ideals behind the labels...honesty, integrity, loyalty and the strength to stand committed to whatever the convictions are that your heart has dictated.

Galleywench
08-11-2004, 02:17 PM
Another two cents from a multidenominational family. Born into Roman catholic family, dad divorced and when he remarried he converted to Judaism. Our family had a hodgepodge of holidays but the basic tenets of faith never truly changed...harm none and do what you will...never realizing what that meant until I was older. My husband is an Athiest for all intents and purposes. Jay beleives in Science, he is a pragmatist and relies on what he can personally witness or experience as physical evidence.

Our daughter is 10 months old and has not been baptised formally. She was baptised a la Archie bunker style in the hospital by 3 people that I am aware of. My two older daughers from my previous marriage are living the Roman catholic faith...parochial school and everything. The fact that thier youger sibling is not being raised the same way has sparked a great deal of debate in our home, some of it quite heated. The arguments are not between my husband and myself but between myself and my 13 year old who is concerned that we are all going to hell for a variety of reasons.

The decision of faith and organized religion in the home is a delicate one and bears waiting until you consider all of the options. The choice will eventually become that of the child no matter what you decide. It seems to be most important that you keep in force the ideals behind the labels...honesty, integrity, loyalty and the strength to stand committed to whatever the convictions are that your heart has dictated.

AngelGypsy
08-11-2004, 04:41 PM
Thanks ladies, for the insight. I really appreciate it.

SO far, the issue has not yet come up. My MIL knows I was raised Catholic but she is not aware that I am now Pagan. I think that would be too much for her poor Lutheran mind to comprehend. He basically considers himself a lapsed Lutheran. He doesnt attend church much to her chagrin.

Oh well, I guess I wil just have to burn that bridge when I get to it, but so far, She has been a wonderful MIL and looks like she will be an outstanding Grandma too. I don't want to hurt or alienate her any more than I have to.

AngelGypsy
08-11-2004, 04:41 PM
Thanks ladies, for the insight. I really appreciate it.

SO far, the issue has not yet come up. My MIL knows I was raised Catholic but she is not aware that I am now Pagan. I think that would be too much for her poor Lutheran mind to comprehend. He basically considers himself a lapsed Lutheran. He doesnt attend church much to her chagrin.

Oh well, I guess I wil just have to burn that bridge when I get to it, but so far, She has been a wonderful MIL and looks like she will be an outstanding Grandma too. I don't want to hurt or alienate her any more than I have to.

MisRed
08-12-2004, 10:19 AM
I raise a child in an "interfaith" family. My MIL is /very/ catholic, my Mom is "spiritual, but not obsessively so" (her words). DH and I are pagan, but different paths.

At 18months the wenchlette was baptized due to MIL's insistance. (Long story). We managed to find a Catholic priest who placed a wiccan naming ceremony in the middle of her baptisim, and welcomed her into the "Light of a greater being". MIL was not happy, Catholic Church was not happy, DH and I were exstatic.

The wenchlette goes to church with MIL Grandma (and has asked recently, she's 8, if she /had/ to anymore since she doesn't like it), goes to the "energy Dr." with my Mom, and participates in ritual with us. She even sat down with my Mom and "had to talk" with her about being pagan. (Mom says it was a wonderful conversation)

She's a bright, thoughtful, spiritual child, who knows she can make decisions about her religion, and she will be supported by her parents.

I was lucky enough at 16 to be exposed to every religion my mother could find, so I could be sure I wanted to be confirmed as an Anglican. It started me down the path I am on now, and I couldn't thank her more for it.

So, to sum up a post that is /way/ to TMI. Follow your heart, let hubby follow his. Don't hide it and /don't/ talk badlly about the others path (Which is hard in a house with a reformed Roman Catholic, lemme tell ya!). Yes, your child might float between religions and never "choose" one side or the other, but /you/ will have given them all of the information you could, and done your job as a parent.

MisRed
08-12-2004, 10:19 AM
I raise a child in an "interfaith" family. My MIL is /very/ catholic, my Mom is "spiritual, but not obsessively so" (her words). DH and I are pagan, but different paths.

At 18months the wenchlette was baptized due to MIL's insistance. (Long story). We managed to find a Catholic priest who placed a wiccan naming ceremony in the middle of her baptisim, and welcomed her into the "Light of a greater being". MIL was not happy, Catholic Church was not happy, DH and I were exstatic.

The wenchlette goes to church with MIL Grandma (and has asked recently, she's 8, if she /had/ to anymore since she doesn't like it), goes to the "energy Dr." with my Mom, and participates in ritual with us. She even sat down with my Mom and "had to talk" with her about being pagan. (Mom says it was a wonderful conversation)

She's a bright, thoughtful, spiritual child, who knows she can make decisions about her religion, and she will be supported by her parents.

I was lucky enough at 16 to be exposed to every religion my mother could find, so I could be sure I wanted to be confirmed as an Anglican. It started me down the path I am on now, and I couldn't thank her more for it.

So, to sum up a post that is /way/ to TMI. Follow your heart, let hubby follow his. Don't hide it and /don't/ talk badlly about the others path (Which is hard in a house with a reformed Roman Catholic, lemme tell ya!). Yes, your child might float between religions and never "choose" one side or the other, but /you/ will have given them all of the information you could, and done your job as a parent.

LashaLaRouge
08-21-2004, 09:01 PM
i agree with letting the child chose when he/she is old enough, tis how my parents did it with me.
I WAS christend as a wee baby, my mother is Roman Catholic my father athiest, but the uk catholic churches seem a lil stricter then us as it is immensly difficult if not christend (baptized) as a baby to get 'back into' the church later in years
So to save the hassle later i was, then (my mother not being a strict practicing catholic) they didnt take me to church. It wastn until i was old enough (seemed competant enough) that i accompanied my mother to church, ill admit it as i did to her i was bored and just didnt quite feel what the 'big shouty man' was saying fit what id imagined. she said fine and my dad told me what he belived, didnt quite like that too, so they told me that i was free to look into anything i wanted with 2 rules, nothing that will phisically hurt you and nothing that will phisically hurt others...(since religion has atendency to cause some emotional anguish in yourself and others from time to time)
I was more than happy to find my own path (and being a typical sag child constantly asking questions...it made me happy to be able to ask those questions and look for different answers from different sources...
i must say i very much apreciate their desicion to let me chose my faith :D

Morte
08-25-2004, 05:52 PM
I see this is an older thread but I wanted to give my .02 as a child of a "mixed" marriage.. although now it doesn't seem that big of a deal when my folks were married that mom is Mormon and dad Catholic really was. They made the concious decision not to baptize any of us and brought us up (well mom did) in Congregational Churches which are fairly non-denominational christian...

As an adult i appreciate that my parents wanted me to have the choice myself and although i was raised christian and very active in church and such through most of my teens i have since realized that a pagan path was much more welcoming to me and have been a practicing pagan for the better part of 10 years...

I guess it depends on your personal take on things every christian baptism i have ever seen has involved a promise from the parents and the congregation to guide the child on the path of that particular church's doctrine. Personally I would be unwilling to make that promise in front of a higher power for any reason. But that's just me 8)

-Morte

PS I'm Pagan and my husband is Jewish and we plan to raise our kids in the UU church were they have "religious education" instead of sunday school where the kids are taught about various religious paths and the beliefs contained in them (although some UU churches are more christian)

Nightfire
08-25-2004, 07:19 PM
This is my firm idea: It isn't what you have faith in, only that you have it. Also don't force the child into "believeing" anything, just give her/him as many ideas as you can, ideas you can change, beliefs are trickier, because people will die and kill for beliefs.

Adriana Rose
08-28-2004, 01:05 AM
Ok I am a proud flag flying pagan and I was baptised (sp?) in a church I can't remeber what denomination Protistant maybe? And I went to church every sunday till my family moved and well church became a hassle. During that time my big oger of a sister introduced me to Wicca and she was in it cuz all her friends were. Stupid!
Anyhoodles I realized that i was not the only person who thought that there was more out there (a pretty intense thought for a 2nd grader) and back to the point.
I suggest that you do the baptism for your spouse creatures mum and then have a naming ceramony for you. Also there are sme really good books on raising a kid in the pagan ways and so on.But also you can mix the two relgions how I donno but be creative about it. And also if it comes to people finding out that you are pagan don't sweat it if they can't handle the idea
Blessings for you and your baby :D

Ravynne
09-30-2004, 04:52 PM
Brightest blessings for you and your family, and the new addition. Slow download, eh? :lol:

I have a slightly different spin on faith, so bear with me.

I believe that there is a large, nameless and faceless force that gives us the spark of life, the glow of intuition and the blaze of intelligence that makes us who we are.

I believe that because we have these gifts, we are all different and like snowflakes, we never will be the same thing in this life. We all have different ideals, goals, thought processes, predjudices, and expectations. And that force realized this, and reaches out to each of our hearts in a different way, through different faiths and dogmas, because no one faith can possibly cater to all the masses in this world.

I believe that as individuals, we should get to pick and choose for ourselves. We can take what we're taught and keep it in comfort and never have another worry again, for the most part. Or we can question it and test it until we're either comfortable with it, or need to find something else that suits us and our lives. We're fortunate that in this country it's a right, even though some folks seem to want to overlook that at all times. I would fully support the teaching of many faiths and perspectives. Learning new things never hurt anyone.

Ultimately, I believe that *all* faiths are good, so long as they promote the basics. Don't hurt anyone. Don't be mean. Don't steal, don't make anyone else feel bad for being different. Keep your nose clean, your soul spotless as you can, and do the right thing. Both Christian AND pagan rhetorics for the most part urge this....and if your MIL finally needs to be told that you're not really a Catholic anymore....you need to sit down (once the fan's been hosed down) and explain to her, rationally, why you feel that your new path works for you, just exactly what your beliefs are, and how you plan to raise her grandchild. Make sure that she knows you're not going to allow the child to go skyclad in cold weather and that helping with sacrifices are right out until they're sixteen. (Just kidding.)

Chances are good that she will come to understand that no matter what, you're still the same person she knows and loves. My mother's jaw is healing nicely from where it hit the floor...and if she can accept, I'm sure that your MIL can.

Strange Jane
10-08-2004, 01:41 PM
I grew up with a Pagan father and a Christian mother.
My dad stayed neutral until I figured out what I wanted.

I was told that I could choose my own path, and I chose Paganism.
I tried the Chritianity route for a while and it really just wasn't me.

At least you and your husband respect eachother's religious choices, where as my parents are still arguing over them, and they have been married for 20 years (I think)
My dad is pretty laid back and semi amused by it, which I think frusterates my mom more.

I think letting your son choose his path is the best way to go, but hey that's just me.

AngelGypsy
10-08-2004, 03:57 PM
Thanks so much EVERYONE for all your input. I still think letting him choose his own way is the best thing too.

It begins.

MIL is beginning to bring up the subject of his christening. Oh bother. She had also been trying to get me to come to some sort of church thing they are doing based on the 40 days of purpose thing. I have a very singular purpose right now, and he's starting to wake up wanting to be fed, and probably needs a diaper change! Anyway. Pretty soon the time I've been dreading will come, and I will have to tell her I don't want to christen him, and might have to explain its because I'm not christian and that I want him to decide for himself what path he wants to take.

*sigh*