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Lady D
06-28-2004, 10:27 PM
I watched "Dangerous Beauty" for the first time two weeks ago, and have since been devouring things on courtesans. My two most highly reccomended books thusfar:

"The Honest Courtesan" by Margaret Rosenthal

"Book of the Courtesans" by Susan Griffin

..both very good, very cool. Especially the latter. :)

-Darcey-

Ysobelle
06-28-2004, 10:56 PM
I have Margaret Rosenthal's book, but I haven't yet been able to read it through. Alas, it's much drier than I would have expected.

I did copy one of Veronica Franco's letters, though, to send you a young man, to plague him, as I knew the chances of him being able to translate 16th century Italian were slim.


Bastard wrote me back in Portuguese.

biker
06-28-2004, 11:02 PM
I
Bastard wrote me back in Portuguese.

Least he had a sense of humor with it.

the first time isaw dangerous beauty was in Dubai, UAE. And it had french spanish and arabic subtitles.

Found myself trying to read said dialects, without knowing them. was wierd.

Ysobelle
06-28-2004, 11:17 PM
I
Bastard wrote me back in Portuguese.

Least he had a sense of humor with it.



It may not have been Portuguese that time, but we went back and forth through Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, and Norwegian-- plus a few other more obscure languages. Anything Freetranslation.com could handle.

I enjoyed it immensely, though I'm sure he didn't mean to call me a pumpkin of the night.

biker
06-28-2004, 11:28 PM
I enjoyed it immensely, though I'm sure he didn't mean to call me a pumpkin of the night.

Peter, Peter???

Lady D
06-28-2004, 11:37 PM
I enjoyed it immensely, though I'm sure he didn't mean to call me a pumpkin of the night.

*grins* My current thing is calling people "my doe" and "my baby seal" in French.

Ma biche and ma foque (mah beesh and ma f*ck, basically), pronounced. :) Translated affectionate terms can be funny.

Like... I believe "ma chou" is "my cabbage".

-Darcey the cunning linguist, figuring she'll hit herself with the comment before anyone else can-

GingerRose
07-23-2004, 02:20 PM
I watched "Dangerous Beauty" for the first time two weeks ago, and have since been devouring things on courtesans. My two most highly reccomended books thusfar:

"The Honest Courtesan" by Margaret Rosenthal

"Book of the Courtesans" by Susan Griffin

..both very good, very cool. Especially the latter. :)

-Darcey-

I loved Dangerous Beauty! I have Honest Courtesan, but haven't finished it yet...I'll have to pick up the second one. Tried doing online research on Courtesans, with dismal success. So....if you find anything else Courtesanish that you think is good, please let us know!

Thanks!!!

Maggi
07-23-2004, 08:48 PM
:) There is a Yahoo group for Courtesans....Good discusions and knowledgable people.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Courtesan


Magaidh

grygrrl
09-07-2004, 12:57 AM
Just getting ready to read Courtesans by Katie Hickman--Will get back to y'all on how I liked it.

nymphet_lilly
09-12-2004, 04:07 PM
Hello, my name is on~topic!!

I purchased a beautiful vintage edition of a book, and have fallen utterly in love with it, even from the foreward. It a work by Pierre Louys, 19th century French author, who is described as 'a French novelist and poet who expressed pagan sensuality with stylistic perfection.' His writing is much influenced by Sappho, and his descriptions of ancient Alexandria were immaculate. He was a great friend of Wilde, and spoke strongly against his imprisonment...what a man!

It is the story of a vintage courtesan, exquisitely written, and absolutely lush...

I found no copy of the text online, and so was obliged to trascribe out this beautiful fragment-

'As for those who ever regret that they knew not this earth intoxicated with youth which we call antique life, let them be permitted to live again, through a fecund illusion, in a time when human nudity-the most perfect form, since we believe in the image of God, which we can know or even conceive-could reveal itself through the features of a sacred courtesan before twenty thousand pilgrims upon the strands of Eleusus; where the most sensual love-the divine love whence we are born-was without stain, without shame and without sin; may they be permitted to forget eighteen barbarous, hypocritical and ugly centuries; to move from the marsh to the spring; to return piously to original beauty; amidst the sound of enchanted flutes to rebuild the Great Temple; and to enthusiastically consecrate to the santuaries of the true faith their hearts even enthralled by the immortal Aphodite.'

Pierre Louys, foreward to Aphrodite, Ancient Manners

If anyone is interested, I could be prevailed upon to copy out more of the foreward, or especially moving sections of the book as I read it. Do let me know if anyone would appreciate this!