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Selena
10-12-2009, 06:30 PM
Because he's "too fat".

Rant warning!
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Oh FFS. If this doesn't tell you (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/10/12/alex-lange-denied-health_n_317337.html) that the insurance companies have this entire country's balls in a sling, I don't know what else will.

Shockingly... after such bad press, the "company" chose to reverse their original dick-csion to give the newborn insurance. Uh-huh....

It's a BABY!

By-the-way future mothers-to-be! Don't fark up your kid's insurance by having a kid who's TOO FAT... by their standards. :roll:



All this stupid shit is causing me to consider moving to.. oh I dunnoooo.... Norway. Gahhh.

Azura
10-13-2009, 04:20 AM
That's just... yikes. All I can see in the picture is one healthy little boy. Heck, you'd think that they'd be tripping over themselves to cover him. He's obviously eating well. If he's anything like my little boy was, he won't even get a cold until he's done breastfeeding.

Cute little fluff of hair, too!

Katie O'Connell
10-13-2009, 02:31 PM
::tinfoil:

Maybe it's just me.... but I can see a rather troubling precedent being set here.

How many people in the country would be discriminated against for health care coverage based on weight or on some 'standard' on height/weight ratio? What was the national percentage of obese people again?


(never mind the fact that there are a lot of people that could be classified as obese who are not an 'disproportionate burden' on health care costs, despite what reports might indicate.)

Phoenix McHeit
10-13-2009, 02:37 PM
It certainly helps that Daddy is a local Newscaster and put his situation out in the public eye. Wonder how many other babies were denied before this?

Damn - babies are SUPPOSED to be 'fat-n-happy' fer cryin out loud! 99th percentile? Well SOMEBODY has to be 1% and somebody has to be 100%. He's within the range, not off the chart completely (ahemNotThatIWouldKnowAnythingAboutThat). Where do they think those growth-curve charts come from anyway? From Normal, Healthy Babies, DUH!

Azura
10-13-2009, 02:55 PM
As a momentary threadjack, my bf is supposedly obese. He's heavy, sure, but he's tall and built like a linebacker. Especially considering his bone and muscle structure, he'd look ridiculous if he was in the normal "healthy" range. He'd literally have to be anorexic to be that weight, a pile of skin and bones. But for some reason that's the determined "normal" for his height. I can only imagine what insurance would do to him if he tried to get a policy from a different company (his is provided through his employer.)

Andreadoria
10-13-2009, 03:12 PM
This is why we need heath care reforms...There is nothing wrong with him other than he is a beautiful healthy breast fed.

Thank all that is good he is not a little person...all forms of dwarfism are not covered by insurance from birth.

As for over weight I am 300lbs and have no health problems other than my thyroid condition...My blood pressure is fine ...heart etc...with exception of my cholesterol be a little high I am fine, my thyroid has caused all health issues and I cannot get that correctly under control and it has caused me to have Fybromialgia. I have even asked to have my thyroid irradiated or removed since by body is killing it and have gotten no were with it. But all the doctors tell me infer you are fat and not worth treating.

But to deny and Baby cause of his percentile is ridiculous...we need major reform NOW!!! Insurance company suck the big one!!

Lady Anne
10-13-2009, 04:02 PM
Just FYI for all those reading the thread, I checked out the link today and apparently the insurance was a not-for-profit rather than a big insurance company and there's been an update.....


Rocky Mountain Health Plans to Cover Heavy Babies

Discovery of Flaw in System Leads to Policy Change

(GRAND JUNCTION, Colo.) – Today, Rocky Mountain Health Plans has made a companywide policy change and will now provide health plan coverage for healthy infants, regardless of their weight.
"A recent situation in which we denied coverage to a heavy, yet healthy, infant brought to our attention a flaw in our underwriting system for approving infants," says Steve ErkenBrack, president and CEO, Rocky Mountain Health Plans. "Because we are a small company dedicated to the people of Colorado, we are pleased to be in a position to act quickly. We have changed our policy, corrected our underwriting guidelines and are working to notify the parents of the infant who we earlier denied."
The trend in health care has been for more and more families with small children to seek individual coverage for their children from health insurers. Rocky Mountain Health Plans has also been seeing this trend. Underwriting for this age group is a relatively new process.
"We are part of the Colorado community too and that includes healthy babies. Rocky Mountain has been serving this community for more than 35 years and our collaborative, community approach to health care is well documented. We are constantly working on new, innovative ways to deliver quality, affordable health plans that are designed for the people of Colorado.

About Rocky Mountain Health Plans
Rocky Mountain Health Plans is a Colorado-based, not-for-profit organization that is uniquely positioned to understand the needs of Colorado’s health care consumers. Founded in 1974, Rocky Mountain provides medical benefit plans and services to more than 170,000 enrollees. It offers a wide range of options including PPO, HMO, and Health Savings Account-eligible plans. Medical plans can be fully-insured, fully-insured with cost sharing options, or self-funded. Rocky Mountain is the first Western Slope employer to receive the Well Workplace award from the Wellness Councils of America and has a thirty-year history of serving businesses, individuals, families, Medicare and Medicaid-eligible persons, and children who receive care under the Child Health Plan Plus program. For more information, contact Rocky Mountain Health Plans at 800-843-0719 or visit www.rmhp.org.

Selena
10-13-2009, 05:16 PM
::tinfoil:

Maybe it's just me.... but I can see a rather troubling precedent being set here.

I hope so, actually, just not the way you'd first look at it. Let's hope it's a precedent as a slap in the face to the insurance companies out there.

The backlash against this insurance company has been overwhelming. Let's hope this gets the word out to others... and that if your breastfed infant is denied coverage as being obese as a "pre-existing condition" (wtf is that all about anyway?), then perhaps others will draw the line and say, NO, I'm not going to accept that answer!!

No more! This has got to be one of the most asinine stories I've read in a while. And coupled with the fact that this very issue is on the front political burners, it should send a message to others out there to tell the insurance companies to fuckoff and get a clue.

Azura
10-13-2009, 07:36 PM
I don't know why, but the thought of a newborn being chunky being labeled a preexisting condition is comically absurd. Especially since the child couldn't really be covered before birth. Just to... I don't know, state the obvious, I guess.

LdyJhawk
10-13-2009, 07:46 PM
::tinfoil:

Maybe it's just me.... but I can see a rather troubling precedent being set here.

How many people in the country would be discriminated against for health care coverage based on weight or on some 'standard' on height/weight ratio? What was the national percentage of obese people again?


(never mind the fact that there are a lot of people that could be classified as obese who are not an 'disproportionate burden' on health care costs, despite what reports might indicate.)

how many WOULD be? No, I WAS turned down multiple times because I was fat and thus a risk

Gemdrite
10-13-2009, 07:54 PM
how many WOULD be? No, I WAS turned down multiple times because I was fat and thus a risk
Yep. Can't get life insurance from any company except the one I have been using since high school, because I'm too fat. Despite the fact that I have absolutely no weight-related conditions. I'm the healthiest fat person I know!

Sorcha Griannon
10-14-2009, 02:18 AM
how many WOULD be? No, I WAS turned down multiple times because I was fat and thus a risk

At 260lbs I was turned down for health insurance due to being 10lbs overweight...now that I have added quite a bit to that number, there is no way that I can get health insurance on my own (I have insurance through my husband's work and my work). I have good blood pressure, normal blood sugar levels, and my cholesterol is in the normal range as well...funny that the skinny girls at my work have more health problems due to one of the three conditions listed above, and would be approved. I don't agree with the weight criteria because it's part of the reason so many overweight or obese people end up with way out of control diseases. If you can't afford to see the dr for a $100 a visit (average in my area), the tests to check for and/or manage the disease, and the cost of the medication, a person isn't going to do it and the condition can spiral out of control, and cost several times more than it should. However, with health insurance (and disease management programs that several offer to support a member with certain conditions) that overweight person could possibly keep their diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, ect, under control, and reduce the cost of the disease.


Sorcha