PDA

View Full Version : New Cervical Cancer screening guidelines



Gellis Indigo
11-20-2009, 11:00 AM
On the heels of the new mammogram guidelines, we now have new PAP smear guidelines (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/20/health/20pap.html) as well.

Recommended PAP smears should now start 3 years after first sexual experience, or no later than 21. And then every other year in your 20's.

Lady Hefron
11-20-2009, 11:12 AM
...and so it begins.

Selena
11-20-2009, 11:32 AM
Oh fuck that! My first one was when I was 16 and sexually active. And I've been annual ever since. It's not just about the pap test... it's the other shit as well that can (and does) happen when you are a woman!

Isabelle Warwicke
11-20-2009, 12:26 PM
In order to keep my birth control pill prescription current, I must have annual testing. I wonder what effect the new "guidelines" will have on that?

Gellis Indigo
11-20-2009, 12:44 PM
I just keep thinking about the major push that we've been seeing to get girls vaccinated to help protect them from HPV, and now we're telling these girls they don't have to get checked as often. Is that sending a mixed message, or is it just me?

Selena
11-20-2009, 01:03 PM
In order to keep my birth control pill prescription current, I must have annual testing. I wonder what effect the new "guidelines" will have on that?

Ditto!
In fact, I had an experience a few years ago because I was 3 months late on getting my "annual"... so he (hint... HE) refused to renew my bc 'script.:unamused:

lady Amalthea
11-20-2009, 01:17 PM
I had my first pap at 16 but wasn't sexually active until 18, my doctor wanted me to start early because my mom has HPV( it only shows up on a pap every few years) and she had a hysterectomy because of early stages of cancer, so my doctor wanted me to start early.

when I was on BC my doctor would only let me have a refill when my script ran out if I had a scheduled appointment within the month. my gyn is also a man, actually he delivered me when I was born.

Phoenix McHeit
11-20-2009, 01:23 PM
I just keep thinking about the major push that we've been seeing to get girls vaccinated to help protect them from HPV, and now we're telling these girls they don't have to get checked as often. Is that sending a mixed message, or is it just me?

Not just you.

Vaccinations are great, but it says right on the advertisements that it doesn't protect against ALL types of cervical cancer.

That being said - from the article:
Dr. Iglesia said the argument for changing Pap screening was more compelling than that for cutting back on mammography — which the obstetricians’ group has staunchly opposed — because there is more potential for harm from the overuse of Pap tests. The reason is that young women are especially prone to develop abnormalities in the cervix that appear to be precancerous, but that will go away if left alone. But when Pap tests find the growths, doctors often remove them, with procedures that can injure the cervix and lead to problems later when a woman becomes pregnant, including premature birth and an increased risk of needing a Caesarean.

I'm one of those 'young women'. Had a smart, unhurried doctor who suggested waiting 6 months to see. They went away. No removal of ok tissue, no cervix injury. But not everyone cares to wait, or believes their doc when they suggest to wait.

Drea Beth
11-20-2009, 02:41 PM
Ditto!
In fact, I had an experience a few years ago because I was 3 months late on getting my "annual"... so he (hint... HE) refused to renew my bc 'script.:unamused:


My Gyn is a woman and she refused my last birth control prescription because I hadn't had my mamo the year before, so wouldn't re-prescribe until I had one this year. To be sure, I made the first available appointment!!!

Gemdrite
11-20-2009, 03:41 PM
See, for me, it's been kind of hit-and-miss with my doctors and BC. I first started getting BC from my doctor when I was 20. She did not do a Pap beforehand (which I distinctly remember arguing with my mother about because she insisted they wouldn't have given me BC without doing one and I informed her that I am pretty sure I would have noticed if they *had* done one.) I had never had a Pap, nor had I had sex. Then I switched to Planned Parenthood cause it was cheaper, and they did a Pap the first time they gave me the shot (I'm on Depo) but I moved before the next one was needed. Got out to Cali, went to Planned Parenthood twice more, but never needed a pap because they wouldn't take appointments, so I just never came in for one. Finally got a regular doctor who required that I have one done, and it hurt so bad I cried and hurt the rest of the day. Again, this doctor was female. But I went to her for 2 years and she never required another Pap. I had also never been sexually active. Even after I had sex once, they still didn't make me get the pap. When I switched this last time to my new doctor, whom I love, she made me get it and said I should be getting it every year now that I am "sexually active." I told her that the word "active" implies actually doing something, which I have not done since that one time, and I will wait and see if she makes me do it again next year.

All female doctors, even the Planned Parenthoods had different guidelines for Paps. One said once every three years, one said every year, one doctor said start at 18, one said start at 16, one said not til 21 or sexually active....

Alluring Alora
11-20-2009, 04:07 PM
Thank God for my annual pap! It did catch cervical displasia which I'm in the middle of dealing with right now.

What if I had waited? Yes, I have HPV, and in a 12-18 moth time, my moderate cervical displasia could have changed to severe, which leads to pre-cancerous cells. That thought scares me to death.

Knowing what I was dealing with just this week, I'd hate to think what the results could have been had I had to wait another year.

Will men be told screening for prostate or testicular cancer isn't important on a regular basis? hmmmmmmmm

Phoenix McHeit
11-20-2009, 04:37 PM
And again, these guidelines are only for women with no history of abnormal test results.


The new guidelines say women 30 and older who have three consecutive Pap tests that were normal, and who have no history of seriously abnormal findings, can stretch the interval between screenings to three years.


It is by no means clear that doctors or patients will follow the new guidelines. Medical groups, including the American Cancer Society (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/a/american_cancer_society/index.html?inline=nyt-org), have been suggesting for years that women with repeated normal Pap tests could begin to have the test less frequently, but many have gone on to have them year after year anyway.