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View Full Version : And a great big thumbs-up to the Texas Board of Ed, too.



Ysobelle
03-12-2010, 07:07 PM
This frightens me even more.


http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/03/12/textbooks-a-texas-dentist-could-love/

March 12, 2010, 4:31 PM
Textbooks a Texas Dentist Could Love
By ROBERT MACKEY
My colleague James McKinley reports that the Texas Board of Education voted on Friday “to approve a social studies curriculum that will put a conservative stamp on history and economics textbooks, stressing the role of Christianity in American history and presenting Republican political philosophies in a more positive light.”

Last month, The New York Times Magazine published an article by Russell Shorto about the influence of that school board. It included an interview with leader of the board’s conservative faction, Dr. Don McLeroy. “I’m a dentist, not a historian,” Dr. McLeroy told Mr. Shorto. “But I’m fascinated by history, so I’ve read a lot.”

This recent video report from ABC News includes an interview with Dr. McLeroy in which he defended his work to correct what he sees as the liberal bias of the experts who write American history textbooks:

*see article itself*

The Texas board has also revised textbook guidelines for the teaching of science to introduce ideas more in keeping with those of Dr. McLeroy. Footage of Dr. McLeroy defending his attempts to introduce doubts about evolution into science textbooks by saying, “ Somebody’s gotta stand up to experts,” is featured on the YouTube channel of the National Center for Science Education.

Here is how Mr. Shorto described the beginning of his interview last year with Dr. McLeroy at his dental office in Bryan, Tex.:

“I consider myself a Christian fundamentalist,” he announced almost as soon as we sat down. He also identifies himself as a young-earth creationist who believes that the earth was created in six days, as the book of Genesis has it, less than 10,000 years ago. He went on to explain how his Christian perspective both governs his work on the state board and guides him in the current effort to adjust American history textbooks to highlight the role of Christianity. “Textbooks are mostly the product of the liberal establishment, and they’re written with the idea that our religion and our liberty are in conflict,” he said. “But Christianity has had a deep impact on our system. The men who wrote the Constitution were Christians who knew the Bible. Our idea of individual rights comes from the Bible. The Western development of the free-market system owes a lot to biblical principles.”

For McLeroy, separation of church and state is a myth perpetrated by secular liberals. “There are two basic facts about man,” he said. “He was created in the image of God, and he is fallen. You can’t appreciate the founding of our country without realizing that the founders understood that. For our kids to not know our history, that could kill a society. That’s why to me this is a huge thing.”

Selena
03-12-2010, 08:27 PM
Their ignorance is astounding.

Bean
03-12-2010, 09:37 PM
Well, they say that history is written by the victors. I guess it holds true in this situation, too,

LdyJhawk
03-12-2010, 10:34 PM
I..what is this....I don't even

No. No because this is America and we aren't actually teaching this to our children, are we? Jesus...it's like "American History: Bill O'Reilly Edition"

daBaroness
03-13-2010, 01:46 AM
::poop:: ::sheep:: :shock: ::WTF::


::rantono: ::taz:: :shame:

Mistress Morigianna
03-13-2010, 04:36 AM
::poop:: ::sheep:: :shock: ::WTF::


::rantono: ::taz:: :shame:

what she said

Kae
03-13-2010, 12:08 PM
As an educator in Texas- yeah it is true. There is a large group working really hard to move the curriculum to uphold "republican ideals". (That is a quote fron the state board of education.) Our only hope is that some of the board members changed with this last election and that Perry will not recieve another term.
Right now is a scary time to be a teacher who is not a fundamentalist or far right in the large state of Texas.

Kae

Selena
03-13-2010, 12:16 PM
Right now is a scary time to be a teacher who is not a fundamentalist or far right in the large state of Texas.

Kae

This has been a movement down here for a while now. It's not new news to me.

Not only is Kae right that it's a scary time to be a teacher, but it's a scary time for this state, if not for this country.

The dumbing down of our country continues.
Don't worry about this, honey... no NEED to think about it... just believe... shut off that mind of yours, no critical thinking here because jesus is your ONLY savior and path to eternal salvation -- NOT science!

As long as it's their 'christian' god, they are happy. But again, I fuckin' guarantee you, the second someone praises allah, they -as a whole - get all pissy and whine about their "rights". It's really getting old.

Cyranno DeBoberac
03-13-2010, 12:17 PM
This frightens me even more.


http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/03/12/textbooks-a-texas-dentist-could-love/

March 12, 2010, 4:31 PM
Textbooks a Texas Dentist Could Love
By ROBERT MACKEY
My colleague James McKinley reports that the Texas Board of Education voted on Friday “to approve a social studies curriculum that will put a conservative stamp on history and economics textbooks, stressing the role of Christianity in American history and presenting Republican political philosophies in a more positive light.”

Last month, The New York Times Magazine published an article by Russell Shorto about the influence of that school board. It included an interview with leader of the board’s conservative faction, Dr. Don McLeroy. “I’m a dentist, not a historian,” Dr. McLeroy told Mr. Shorto. “But I’m fascinated by history, so I’ve read a lot.”

This recent video report from ABC News includes an interview with Dr. McLeroy in which he defended his work to correct what he sees as the liberal bias of the experts who write American history textbooks:

*see article itself*

The Texas board has also revised textbook guidelines for the teaching of science to introduce ideas more in keeping with those of Dr. McLeroy. Footage of Dr. McLeroy defending his attempts to introduce doubts about evolution into science textbooks by saying, “ Somebody’s gotta stand up to experts,” is featured on the YouTube channel of the National Center for Science Education.

Here is how Mr. Shorto described the beginning of his interview last year with Dr. McLeroy at his dental office in Bryan, Tex.:

“I consider myself a Christian fundamentalist,” he announced almost as soon as we sat down. He also identifies himself as a young-earth creationist who believes that the earth was created in six days, as the book of Genesis has it, less than 10,000 years ago. He went on to explain how his Christian perspective both governs his work on the state board and guides him in the current effort to adjust American history textbooks to highlight the role of Christianity. “Textbooks are mostly the product of the liberal establishment, and they’re written with the idea that our religion and our liberty are in conflict,” he said. “But Christianity has had a deep impact on our system. The men who wrote the Constitution were Christians who knew the Bible. Our idea of individual rights comes from the Bible. The Western development of the free-market system owes a lot to biblical principles.”

For McLeroy, separation of church and state is a myth perpetrated by secular liberals. “There are two basic facts about man,” he said. “He was created in the image of God, and he is fallen. You can’t appreciate the founding of our country without realizing that the founders understood that. For our kids to not know our history, that could kill a society. That’s why to me this is a huge thing.”

http://techbuddha.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/double-facepalm.jpg

LdyJhawk
03-13-2010, 01:41 PM
the scariest part is that Texas has a huge influence on learning materials across the US. With their massive education system down there, they tend to be the default textbooks that are copied for smaller states who can't really afford custom ordering books

Ysobelle
03-13-2010, 02:57 PM
the scariest part is that Texas has a huge influence on learning materials across the US. With their massive education system down there, they tend to be the default textbooks that are copied for smaller states who can't really afford custom ordering books



So I'm sure Mississippi is absolutely THRILLED right about now.

shadowcat546
03-13-2010, 10:57 PM
horrible. scary.
I approve of the picture of Star Trek n.g., double-facepalm. it sums up the situation.

Ysobelle
03-13-2010, 11:36 PM
Oh, but WAIT! There's MORE!


http://www.aolnews.com/nation/article/texas-removes-thomas-jefferson-from-teaching-standard/19397481



Texas Yanks Thomas Jefferson From Teaching Standard
Updated: 11 hours 30 minutes ago
Print Text Size E-mail More

David Knowles
Writer
AOL News
(March 12) -- Widely regarded as one of the most important of all the founding fathers of the United States, Thomas Jefferson received a demotion of sorts Friday thanks to the Texas Board of Education.

The board voted to enact new teaching standards for history and social studies that will alter which material gets included in school textbooks. It decided to drop Jefferson from a world history section devoted to great political thinkers.

According to Texas Freedom Network, a group that opposes many of the changes put in place by the Board of Education, the original curriculum asked students to "explain the impact of Enlightenment ideas from John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, Voltaire, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean Jacques Rousseau and Thomas Jefferson on political revolutions from 1750 to the present."

AP
The Texas Board of Education is dropping President Thomas Jefferson from a world history section devoted to great political thinkers.

That emphasis did not sit well with board member Cynthia Dunbar, who, during Friday's meeting, explained the rationale for changing it. "The Enlightenment was not the only philosophy on which these revolutions were based," Dunbar said.

The new standard, passed at the meeting in a 10-5 vote, now reads, "Explain the impact of the writings of John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, Voltaire, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Thomas Aquinas, John Calvin and Sir William Blackstone."

By dropping mention of revolution, and substituting figures such as Aquinas and Calvin for Jefferson, Texas Freedom Network argues, the board had chosen to embrace religious teachings over those of Jefferson, the man who coined the phrase "separation between church and state."

According to USA Today, the board also voted to strike the word "democratic" from references to the U.S. form of government, replacing it with the term "constitutional republic." Texas textbooks will contain references to "laws of nature and nature's God" in passages that discuss major political ideas.

The board decided to use the words "free enterprise" when describing the U.S. economic system rather than words such as "capitalism," "capitalist" and "free market," which it deemed to have a negative connotation.

Serving 4.7 million students, Texas accounts for a large percentage of the textbook market, and the new standards may influence what is taught in the rest of the country.

Bronya
03-14-2010, 12:29 AM
Wha..huh...this is scary.

Cyranno DeBoberac
03-14-2010, 01:21 PM
So they don't like Jefferson because he coined the phrase "separation between church and state"???

I would think though that would get balanced out for them by the fact that he kept slaves.

DameGoode
03-15-2010, 11:10 PM
I'm suprised that they kept Voltaire.... hmmm... If they got rid of Jefferson, I wonder why they didn't substitute Ben Franklin.

Azura
03-15-2010, 11:38 PM
I'm suprised that they kept Voltaire.... hmmm... If they got rid of Jefferson, I wonder why they didn't substitute Ben Franklin.

Maybe because he loved women and drink a little too much? I guess I'm not really sure. But when one is editing history, one could make up anything they want, really.

Thistle
03-16-2010, 01:56 AM
...and this is also Texas scary. Fundy terrorists, even threatening Christian churches they think are too "Liberal" http://www.texasobserver.org/dateline/he-who-casts-the-first-stone

Ysobelle
03-16-2010, 02:29 AM
...and this is also Texas scary. Fundy terrorists, even threatening Christian churches they think are too "Liberal" http://www.texasobserver.org/dateline/he-who-casts-the-first-stone



Oh, my G-d, I think that actually sent my blood pressure through the roof.

prospero
03-16-2010, 03:14 AM
Excellent. Next they can replace those pesky “science” texts with books that have actual facts. This will rid them, then all of us of the bugaboos of critical thinking and reason.
I love Young Earth believers. They crack me up. For them reality is one giant conspiracy theory.

I was in a CVS Pharmacy the other day and among the medical reference manuals was Prayers that Rout Demons (http://www.amazon.com/Prayers-That-Rout-Demons-Eckhardt/dp/159979246X). They're in stock, get yours today!

Isabelle Warwicke
03-16-2010, 03:49 AM
Oh, my G-d, I think that actually sent my blood pressure through the roof.

Yes, it did. Especially this part:

They’ve posted a “Warfare Map” on the group’s Web site. The map includes establishments like gay bars, strip clubs and porn shops, but also the Wildcat Bluff Nature Center. Repent believes the 600-acre prairie park’s Walmart-funded “Earth Circle,” used for lectures, is a Mecca for witches and pagans. Also on the list are The 806 coffeehouse (a hangout for artists and counterculture types), the Islamic Center of Amarillo (“Allah is a false god”), and “compromised churches” like Polk Street Methodist (gay-friendly).

Cyranno DeBoberac
03-16-2010, 04:43 AM
...and this is also Texas scary. Fundy terrorists, even threatening Christian churches they think are too "Liberal" http://www.texasobserver.org/dateline/he-who-casts-the-first-stone

Usually, I oppose church bombings....

Isabelle Warwicke
03-16-2010, 11:33 AM
Usually, I oppose church bombings....

Get outta mah hed.

Cyranno DeBoberac
03-16-2010, 05:10 PM
It's stories like this that make me wish there actually was a god, because these Repent fucktards would almost certainly be at the top of his To Smite list, wouldn't they?

Maybe the Phelps cult would come first, but what's the point of being omnipotent if you can't multitask?

Phoenix McHeit
03-16-2010, 05:27 PM
what's the point of being omnipotent if you can't multitask?

It's phrases like this that remind me why I lurve you.

Cyranno DeBoberac
03-17-2010, 02:25 AM
It's phrases like this that remind me why I lurve you.

:kiss:

The 6th Rogue
03-17-2010, 04:24 PM
My view on nutbags like those have always been the same: "Do unto others as they'd have done unto you." The way that's phrased is deliberate; nail the effers before they can do real damage. Best way to handle religious zealots that appoint themselves soldiers is to report them to ALL the law enforcement and political organizations loudly, regularly and often for everything they do from jaywalking to violent protest related activities. Some up and coming law enforcement officer, lawyer or political official will be more than happy to use them for personal advancement of their career by slapping them around in the media eye.

Also, by establishing a rap sheet for the group and it's members any extracurricular retribution you or any of those they are trying to oppress perform on them will usually be seen in the courts as provoked by them in the first place making them even less able to achieve their goals.

Cyranno DeBoberac
03-17-2010, 07:47 PM
My view on nutbags like those have always been the same: "Do unto others as they'd have done unto you." The way that's phrased is deliberate; nail the effers before they can do real damage. Best way to handle religious zealots that appoint themselves soldiers is to report them to ALL the law enforcement and political organizations loudly, regularly and often for everything they do from jaywalking to violent protest related activities. Some up and coming law enforcement officer, lawyer or political official will be more than happy to use them for personal advancement of their career by slapping them around in the media eye.

Problem is that local law enforcement appears to be tolerant of, if not fully complicit in (for instance, who is running the swingers' license plates), their activities.

Fucking hick town Barneys. :rolleyes:

Zoie La Belle
03-18-2010, 09:46 AM
They’ve posted a “Warfare Map” on the group’s Web site. The map includes establishments like gay bars, strip clubs and porn shops, but also the Wildcat Bluff Nature Center. Repent believes the 600-acre prairie park’s Walmart-funded “Earth Circle,” used for lectures, is a Mecca for witches and pagans. Also on the list are The 806 coffeehouse (a hangout for artists and counterculture types), the Islamic Center of Amarillo (“Allah is a false god”), and “compromised churches” like Polk Street Methodist (gay-friendly).[/I]

And you might have guessed that we have evolved PAST such closed minded, ignorant, ideals? *grumble*

The 6th Rogue
03-18-2010, 10:49 AM
Problem is that local law enforcement appears to be tolerant of, if not fully complicit in (for instance, who is running the swingers' license plates), their activities.

Fucking hick town Barneys. :rolleyes:

There's always someone above or parallel to them that you can go to and there's also usually a rivalry. It's fun to start a war and then sit back and watch. Just ask Sun Tzu.

Cyranno DeBoberac
03-18-2010, 11:11 AM
http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o129/grondramb/mike03182010.jpg

Cyranno DeBoberac
04-03-2010, 05:18 PM
Dear Texas:

Please shut up.

Sincerely, History

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2010/03/17/notes031710.DTL