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View Full Version : Beware the Ides of March



Bronya
03-15-2010, 04:29 PM
I know I am a seasoned wench, but I am frustrated. I had to explain to my sales person, what this meant. I know our school system needs some adjustments. The teachers are way underpaid and have to do a lot of babysitting, but she is 40 years old! Could it just be her? Don't they still teach the classics, or mythology, Shakespear or World history anymore? ::rantono:

Phoenix McHeit
03-15-2010, 04:33 PM
When the teachers have to 'teach to the test' and are so stressed about getting everyone to pass a ridiculous benchmark test so they won't lose their funding, sadly the classics are one of the things that get pushed aside.

It's up to parents to fill in the gaps that are left.

Bronya
03-15-2010, 04:38 PM
Your correct. My SIL is a math teacher in High School and what he HAS to do or NOT do is extrememly sad and frustrating on his part. I just meant that 25 years ago, things hadn't gotten so bad, or maybe they did. I in no way would ever complain about a teacher now with what they have to deal with, administration wise.

Lady Hefron
03-15-2010, 04:55 PM
I learned it in public school Ancient History. This person is only 6 years younger than me.

Drea Beth
03-15-2010, 05:37 PM
One would think that the phrase has become such a coloquialism that everyone would have at least heard it...




...or maybe not.


I learned it in HS English.

Margaret
03-15-2010, 05:55 PM
I never learned this in school (I'm 43). I must have heard it somewhere, was curious and looked it up or had it explained to me.

Back in HS, I remember Romeo & Juliet was the only full play we read other than that, it was segments of other Shakesperian plays and sonnets.

LdyJhawk
03-15-2010, 07:39 PM
I only learned it when I took AP English and World History classes..

Then again, I had a history teacher who started us learning about Julius by putting up a comic that had "Good LORD, Brutus. What is it that just struck me in the head?" "Hail, Caesar!" setup on it. I liked Mr Bagby

MaidenFaeSnow
03-16-2010, 08:14 AM
I never learned this in school (I'm 43). I must have heard it somewhere, was curious and looked it up or had it explained to me.

Back in HS, I remember Romeo & Juliet was the only full play we read other than that, it was segments of other Shakesperian plays and sonnets.

Same here and I'm 44.

I majored in elementary education and the further I got into my college work, the less I wanted to actually teach elementary school. I loved my placement work, but I wasn't the responsible teacher during my placement, so there were things I didn't yet need to hold my breath about. It was very sad to me at the time that when a second grader really needed (or wanted) a hug, we couldn't give them. All we could do was try to comfort or encourage them with words. It was all too political for me. Rushing through lessons to make sure everything got covered rather than taking the time to ensure the kids absorbed the material.

Ravin' Raven
03-16-2010, 10:40 AM
"Good LORD, Brutus. What is it that just struck me in the head?" "Hail, Caesar!"

The geek in me loves that.....*rotfl*

I think I knew about the Ides of March around elementary school but, then again, I'm weird...I have the following at my desk "oderint, dum metuant" and a picture of a squirrel saying "Rise my Army, Rise"

Isabelle Warwicke
03-16-2010, 11:32 AM
"Fates, we will know your pleasures:That we shall die, we know; 'tis but the time, and drawing days out, that men stand upon."

Selena
03-16-2010, 12:13 PM
My father is a retired history teacher. I better know where that phrase comes from!!

Mirrin
03-16-2010, 01:19 PM
I learned about it when I was reading Shakespeare when I was about seven. I had to ask someone what it was....
I recall it was touched on in high school, though I honestly couldn't tell you what year. I was in all honors/AP/actual college classes though, so I really don't know if your average chap ever learned about such things.

Alluring Alora
03-16-2010, 02:51 PM
I remember in 10th grade, Mrs. Rohde changed the display bulletin board in her room monthly. She put that up for March, had us all guess what it might mean, then taught us what it really meant.

wrenchwench
03-16-2010, 08:02 PM
As a kid I thought it was a warning to everyone that my youngest brother was born. I then had it explained in detail. I was quite disappointed not everyone was as concerned with the new brat um I mean brother as I was. ::whistle::

SpeedKnight
03-16-2010, 08:47 PM
"oderint, dum metuant"

I'm pretty sure this is in my siggy. It's a quote from Caligula which means "Let them hate, so long as they fear."


As far as "Beware the Ides of March" goes, I'm pretty sure I had to read Caeser for 8th grade humanities class. I can also tell you what "Et tu, Brute?" is asking. I'm gonna be 35 in a little over 2 weeks.

Gemdrite
03-16-2010, 09:20 PM
I learned it my sophomore year of high school, and I'm 24. Not sure if my brothers learned it or not after me.

Ysobelle
03-16-2010, 10:13 PM
I learned it, but then, I went to a private Quaker school.