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erinrai
06-04-2010, 09:33 AM
This bothers me on a few levels. As my 15 year old put it, "It would make us seem uneducated."

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100603/ap_on_re_us/us_spelling_bee_protest

The gist is that the way we spell words is too hard and prevents part of the population from learning to read and write. I think the geek in me died a little. What say you?

Gellis Indigo
06-04-2010, 09:46 AM
*sigh* The dumbing down of America continues. :augh:

Gemdrite
06-04-2010, 10:45 AM
First thing I thought of was the book 1984.

Lady Hefron
06-04-2010, 11:11 AM
For crying out loud, enough. What we should be doing is improving the educational system. Instead of dumbing things down let's smarten people up. If you lower the bar, people will descend to it, if you place it higher, people will work to rise.

Major pet peeve - texting spelling in real life. grrrrrr

Isabelle Warwicke
06-04-2010, 11:12 AM
This is a great way to destroy America. Our fastest growing demographic groups are already the least educated among us.

Governor Richard Lamm has a valid point (http://www.truthorfiction.com/rumors/l/lamm.htm).

surlywench
06-04-2010, 02:01 PM
spelling wasn't always standardized. people would spell the same word multiple ways, within the same correspondence. but....it's sure standardized now. so....lets not fuck it up?

Stolenhalo6
06-05-2010, 01:21 PM
From somebody who has a very hard time with spelling - I'm offended by the idea of making spelling "easier". Jiminy Crickets people, I managed to still be very successful academically and professionally with poor spelling. I really resent the lazy people of America giving those of us who have genuine difficulties a bad name. It wasn't until the third grade that my teachers fully realized that I couldn't read. Have I spent my life saying boohoo woe is me? NO! I sucked it up and worked harder. Does it take me three times longer to read than other people at my education level? Yes. Do I have to read things more than twice to fully understand them? Yes. Do I constantly have to look up the phonetic spelling of words so that I can recognize them and their meaning? Yes. Do I tend to score 5% lower on tests that are timed because I simply run out of time to read all the problems? Yes. But all the extra work I've put in to overcome my difficulties has helped make me a productive member of society, not a lazy @$$ leech that expects everything to be handed to me.

Sorry to rant. I just really take this issue to heart.

Gellis Indigo
06-05-2010, 04:21 PM
Sorry to rant. I just really take this issue to heart.

Bless you for saying this. And bless you for putting in the work I know it took/takes to become educated, instead of using it as a crutch. It's students like you that make me love my job.
::bighug::

Jayde
06-06-2010, 07:59 AM
I originally saw this on a friend's Facebook page. I was not exactly pleased.

I have a couple of friends over in England, they already pick on us for the way we spell certain words.

I mean, ok, I will admit I am guilty of using "u" instead of "you" and various other abbreviations, But that's usually based on how much room I have to type (texting) or how fast I have to type (trying to chat during a game or something similar). But to cmpletely change the spelling to a more "simplified" method? :irked:


Next thing you know, the ads will truly say "Huked on fonicks wurked for me"...:roll:

Isabelle Warwicke
06-06-2010, 11:43 AM
Next thing you know, the ads will truly say "Huked on fonicks wurked for me"...:roll:

You spelled that wrong. It's "Fonix."

Lady Hefron
06-06-2010, 11:53 AM
Governor Richard Lamm has a valid point (http://www.truthorfiction.com/rumors/l/lamm.htm).

Yikes, this is scarily on point. Unless we learn from history we are doomed to repeat it.

Selena
06-06-2010, 01:04 PM
Unless we learn from history we are doomed to repeat it.

We never will learn.
Humans, as a whole, are dumb creatures. We really are. We are creatures of habit, good and bad. Do you (in general) really think we've learned anything from the mistakes of our ancestors' past?

I give you the Roman Empire as exhibit number one.
I give you the Spanish Inquisition as exhibit number two.
I give you The Crusades as exhibit number three.
I give you the Salem witch trials as exhibit number four.
I give you both World Wars (both within a single century, I might add) as exhibit number five.

We have evolved, but we never really learn.

Gemdrite
06-06-2010, 01:07 PM
I will confess though, every time I teach a rule of the English language and then promptly teach all of its many exceptions, I have wondered what it would be like if we simplified our language a little so that we didn't have so many exceptions to the rules. After all, English is a very hobbled language, pulled together from many other languages, instead of being created from the ground up and streamlined. I just don't see it realistically happening.

Selena
06-06-2010, 01:15 PM
I will confess though, every time I teach a rule of the English language and then promptly teach all of its many exceptions, I have wondered what it would be like if we simplified our language a little so that we didn't have so many exceptions to the rules. After all, English is a very hobbled language, pulled together from many other languages, instead of being created from the ground up and streamlined. I just don't see it realistically happening.

Can't disagree with you there, but many languages are mixtures/adaptations of others.

Wanna simply a language? Let's start with the Icelandic one first (http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2010/04/iceland_volcano_eyjafjallajoku.html)! ;-)

The 6th Rogue
06-06-2010, 09:24 PM
Taken from somewhere on the web since youtube didn't have the skit available:

The Decabet was a Saturday Night Live sketch in which Mr. Joseph Franklin (played by Dan Aykroyd) of the U.S. Council of Standards and Measures introduces the new "metric alphabet"-the "Decabet". It originally aired on April 24, 1976 (season 1, episode 18). In the Decabet, the first four letters, A, B, C, and D remain the same. The letters E and F are combined into one character, Г. For example, the word "eagle" would be spelled "ГaglГ" and would be pronounced, "Ee-fag-lef" The letters G, H, and I would become one letter, "GHI" and the letters L, M, N, and O would become "LMNO", pronounced "Elemenoh", as in, "Please lmnopen the door." Lastly, the so-called "trash letters" (P through Z) would be combined into a single letter, so an ordinary "stop" sign would look like an incomprehensible mess of letters all squashed together. For example, the word 'alphabet' would be spelled A-LMNO-PQRSTUVWXYZ-GHI-A-B-EF-PQRSTUVWXYZ The sketch was written as a satirical jab at the U.S. government.

Gemdrite
06-06-2010, 11:49 PM
One of the funniest quotes I've ever read on the internet was this:

English didn't borrow from other languages. It followed them down a dark alley, beat them up, and stole the loose grammar from their pockets.

I don't know who said it first, but I always thought it was funny because it seems so true.

The 6th Rogue
06-07-2010, 10:41 AM
Can't argue with that one. LOL!