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Lady Hefron
11-18-2010, 09:03 PM
In time of trouble or when in need of help I turn to my sister wenches. As you may know Paul and I are taking care of our 14 month old granddaughter for several months while our daughter finishes her training in the Navy and our son-in-law is out on a ship. We have her in daycare for 4 days a week.

Here is the problem. Does one tip the daycare provider for Christmas or does one get her a gift? If one gets a gift, what kind of gift?

This is my first experience with daycare so I am completely out of my element. HELP.

surlywench
11-18-2010, 09:16 PM
I guess you can do either, but "tipping" is kind of impersonal. This person watches your granddaughter, that's a fairly important thing to be doing. If you want to get a gift, I used to get my daycare chic gift certificates to places like LUSH, or bookstores. Certificates/gift cards to local places to eat are always nice, too!

daBaroness
11-18-2010, 10:23 PM
I think giftcards sound like a wonderful idea. Maybe to a nice restaurant or some other "adult" venue for a childcare giver to have a little child-less time. ;-)

Lady Dee Va
11-18-2010, 11:49 PM
I would go with a gift, the more personal the better or homemade treats like a yummy cake you make, or fudge! Gift Cards are nice all the time. Otherwise if your watching cash flow some nice candles or bubble bath sets.

Most importantly a nice hand written note thanking them for taking good care of your Grandchild and wishing them a Happy (insert winter gift giving term here) gives it more of that personal I care touch much better then that "I picked this up at the drugstore this morning because I felt obligated" touch. I know thats what I love to receive from the Sunday School parents, the little notes of encouragement really help when you get stressed out!

Torra
11-19-2010, 07:21 AM
Gift always go over better than a tip. But I think a handwritten note is most valued if only because it's a testament to the good job you think they're doing - it's not something you got them out of perceived obligation.

Lady Hefron
11-19-2010, 09:41 AM
Thank you all. I knew you all would have the answer. I always include a handwritten note with a gift or tip. I just wasn't sure of the etiquette of it.

I like the idea of a gift certificate to a local eatery. We have a few really nice places in town. Or a "spa" gift bag.

Thanks again Ladies.

Gemdrite
11-19-2010, 10:39 AM
Thank you all. I knew you all would have the answer. I always include a handwritten note with a gift or tip. I just wasn't sure of the etiquette of it.

I like the idea of a gift certificate to a local eatery. We have a few really nice places in town. Or a "spa" gift bag.

Thanks again Ladies.
I would caution to perhaps chat with her casually and find out some of her interests, and chose a gift card or certificate from there. I say this, because while those of us who work with children love any show of appreciation we receive, we often receive gift cards and gifts that we either have a ton of, or that we can't use. For example, I often receive coffee cups/coffee gift cards. I don't drink coffee. While I always thank the child and show as much appreciation for it as anything else, I usually end up giving them away to someone else. The gifts that warm my heart the most are the ones that show that either child or parent was actually paying attention to things I said and made the effort to find something to match. My first year of teaching, I had a student who gave me a pair of purple gloves with this crazy huge fake diamond on the left hand. I live in SoCal; it's never cold enough for gloves. But they were purple, and he knew my favorite color is purple. I still have those gloves.

I also find that people tend to assume that because I work with kids all day, I want to be away from them when I am done. If I didn't like kids, I wouldn't work with them. I am, however, single, and my tastes tend to run cheap. For me personally, a nice restaurant gift certificate, while appreciated, means I would end up having to find someone else who could afford that restaurant, and then I'd have to *gaspandchoke* dress up! :D So it isn't really my style. I'm all about Chik-Fil-A, or TGIFridays, or Olive Garden, lol. So anyways, my point is, have a chat with her and find out what interests her. She'll appreciate anything, I'm sure, but what's better than the pricetag of the gift is the thought behind it, just like the handwritten card.

Lady Hefron
11-19-2010, 09:58 PM
Good point Gem. My thoughts have been running to a Visa type card that she could use anywhere.

Your story reminds me of my Mom. She was a bus driver for 30 years (she retired a few years ago). She would get a bunch of gifts, many of which my sister and I benefited from because they were things my Mom just couldn't or wouldn't ever use. Although she was very stingy with the handmade chocolates :snicker:

erinrai
11-19-2010, 10:42 PM
I would caution to perhaps chat with her casually and find out some of her interests, and chose a gift card or certificate from there. I say this, because while those of us who work with children love any show of appreciation we receive, we often receive gift cards and gifts that we either have a ton of, or that we can't use. For example, I often receive coffee cups/coffee gift cards. I don't drink coffee. While I always thank the child and show as much appreciation for it as anything else, I usually end up giving them away to someone else. The gifts that warm my heart the most are the ones that show that either child or parent was actually paying attention to things I said and made the effort to find something to match. My first year of teaching, I had a student who gave me a pair of purple gloves with this crazy huge fake diamond on the left hand. I live in SoCal; it's never cold enough for gloves. But they were purple, and he knew my favorite color is purple. I still have those gloves.

I also find that people tend to assume that because I work with kids all day, I want to be away from them when I am done. If I didn't like kids, I wouldn't work with them. I am, however, single, and my tastes tend to run cheap. For me personally, a nice restaurant gift certificate, while appreciated, means I would end up having to find someone else who could afford that restaurant, and then I'd have to *gaspandchoke* dress up! :D So it isn't really my style. I'm all about Chik-Fil-A, or TGIFridays, or Olive Garden, lol. So anyways, my point is, have a chat with her and find out what interests her. She'll appreciate anything, I'm sure, but what's better than the pricetag of the gift is the thought behind it, just like the handwritten card.


I totally agree with Gem. I have two cardboard boxes of coffee mugs and the like from when I was a daycare provider. The only gifts I have from any of the children that see the light of day are a necklace that I wear everyday (it is a celtic cross from Ireland with a mustard seed in the middle, the mom knew I am proud of my Irish heritage) and several hand written cards and letters that I bring out once in a while to read.
Talk with her and truly listen.

Gemdrite
11-20-2010, 12:08 AM
It's actually kind of funny, after the kids leave on the last day before Christmas break, the teachers start swapping cards around. "Who wants Starbucks? I'll trade you for Borders!" :lol:

AnnaFaerie
11-20-2010, 08:00 AM
I have chuckled at this thread only because I come from a long line of teachers and I married into a family of teachers. This thread has brought back so many memories of said teachers moaning about some of the gifts they received every year. I know that sounds awful, but it is true. They always appreciated the thought just not some of the gifts. Perfume and soaps...don't do it unless you know what perfume they wear. I don't remember my mother-in-law every receiving her own perfume and she only wore one perfume. She taught for 44.5 years. When she passed she had maybe 6 items from students and they were her treasures.
I talked to the teachers of my own children and gifts they mentioned were given.
My granddaughter is in first grade. Last year her teacher was given money and at the end of school she was given a "Visa Like" gift card. She teared up with both. It had been a hard year for her...health-wise and she had lots of out of pocket expenses.
I agree with Gem (yes again) *laughing* ask her what would be best. If she tries to avoid an answer go with the gift card she can use anywhere.
This is my not so humble opinion.

Torra
11-20-2010, 08:11 AM
I used to love going through my mom's Christmas gifts from her students, before she retired! We'd always try to make up a conversation that led to getting the extremely top-heavy pencil with ceramic applecore topper, sans eraser, or the storebought looks-like-it-was-handmade clay pot too small to function. It made her laugh and the kids always meant well but it was fun to play into what we knew about them (Billy does really well in her class, so why on earth did he get her a red sharpie pack? Clearly he thinks you need red lips.)